3 Secrets of Successful YA Suspense Thrillers

by Patricia Komar

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patricia01
Posted by patricia01
Suspense thrillers are a popular genre that has never quite lost steam over the last few decades, particularly among teen readers who can't get enough of thrilling stories. Young Adult suspense novels are a popular choice for authors from around the world, including female mystery writers Canada; if you are interested in breaking into the genre or you’re already working on your latest suspense novel, consider the following secrets of writing successful YA thrillers.

#1: Teens need to have the agency

In a traditional suspense thriller, it’s normal for adult characters—who usually comprise most of, if not the entire, cast—to have the agency. In a YA thriller, it’s the teen protagonist, their friends, and other characters their own age who need to have the ability to get things done. For example, YA readers won’t enjoy reading how your teen protagonist’s adult teacher gives them the key to the archives where they uncover something important; instead, you could have your teen character sneak into the archives at night after they’re denied access.

#2: Fast-paced plots hook YA readers the best

Too much plot can really bog down a YA suspense novel. For YA readers, young and old alike, a fast plot is the best plot. This doesn’t mean you should skimp on important details or descriptions that flesh out your story and make it a well-written novel, but make sure that you aren’t spending too much time on tangents that aren’t vital to propelling the story forward. As a general rule, you want your readers to always feel compelled to keep turning the page to find out what happens.

#3: Red-herrings and twists keep the story engaging

A predictable suspense thriller is ultimately a boring suspense thriller. One of the ways that you can keep your story engaging and unpredictable for readers is introduce red herrings and twists to keep readers on their toes. Red herrings and multiple suspects are a definite must if your thriller has a mystery angle to it, because it prevents readers from guessing the resolution too early on in the story.



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